Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Multidrug pseudomonal resistance remains stable and on par with other developed nations

Background

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a widespread pathogen in the hospital environment that frequently forms “biofilm,” a permanent plaque on medical equipment, and colonizes tissues of long-stay patients. It is considered an opportunistic pathogen, meaning it exclusively strikes affected organ systems of the immunocompromised and seriously ill. Pneumonia, bloodstream, and urinary tract infections are associated with mortality rates that can exceed 50% and high treatment failure because of its intrinsic resistance against many antibiotics.

The observed stability of multidrug resistance rates over time could imply pseudmonal strains are not acquiring new resistance mechanisms, unlike other gram-negative pathogens. However, measures to contain the spread of resistant strains at the local level are still essential: although national and regional in-vitro levels remain stable, individual sites report that that multidrug resistance to several agents at once is becoming more common as various resistance mechanisms act in tandem.