Proteus mirabilis Overview

Proteus mirabilis Overview

Resistance to P. mirabilis remains low but steadily increasing

Background

Proteus mirabilis is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family of bacteria, along with E. coli and K. pneumoniae, which together account for the vast majority of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs)P. mirabilis comensally inhabits the gastrointestinal tract without causing disease. However, when it colonizes sterile parts of the body, it can be difficult to eliminate because it tends to produce a biofilm of mineral deposits (e.g., kidney stones).

The trend visualizations illustrate that susceptibility of P. mirabilis to most major antibiotics is still high but is rapidly declining, particularly in the eastern parts of the United States. Strains producing enzymes (CTX-M-15 and extended spectrum beta-lactamases) that confer resistance to multiple drugs are becoming more frequent in North America and Europe, likely driving the observed trend. The emergence of these enzymes is cause for concern because they are readily shared among other Enterobacteriaceae, such as E. coli, that are far more common in the community.