September 2010

30 Sep 2010
The population sex ratio in the developed nations within Europe and North America is slightly biased toward women (about 50.1% population share). While the “natural” sex ratio at birth is approximately 105 boys for every 100 girls, the higher mortality rate of young boys eventually leads to a greater number of women. In a striking juxtaposition, countries such as China, India and Taiwan experience a strong masculine sex ratio at birth coupled with a survival disadvantage of young girls, which leads to a relative absence of women in the overall population (48.4% population share).
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Posted by Arindam Nandi
27 Sep 2010
A recent study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology found that the ICD-9-CM codes for urinary tract infections (UTIs) are unable to successfully identify hospital-acquired catheter-associated UTIs.
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21 Sep 2010
Ever since Amartya Sen's use of the phrase “Missing Women” in his 1990 article in The New York Review of Books (and in the British Medical Journal, 1992), the growing gender imbalance in parts of Asia, particularly China and India, has attracted much attention from researchers – demographers and economists alike. Numerous studies have sought to explain the existence of a low female-to-male sex ratio and its increasing masculinization over time in these societies. Concurrently, awareness campaigns by interest groups have initiated proactive demographic polic
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Posted by Arindam Nandi
Tags: kids, policy
15 Sep 2010
On September 7th, Health Affairs published an Extending the Cure-sponsored study on policy options to combat antibiotic resistance. The study examines how the current health system is failing to limit antibiotic resistance and offers a radical policy solution to the problem: setting “effectiveness targets” for new drugs. These targets would encourage both development and responsible marketing of new antibiotics by tying goals for limiting resistance to financial incentives such as enhanced reimbursement or market exclusivity. Ramanan Laxminarayan, Direc
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Posted by Andrea Titus
14 Sep 2010
About 19,000 people a year die after battling the superbug MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Others survive but pay a high price. That’s what happened to Kerri Cardello, a 39-year-old from Annapolis, Md. Her long fight began on Christmas Day 2003 when she woke up feeling ill.  A high, persistent fever sent her to the hospital emergency room, but they sent her home--saying she had the flu. Cardello just kept getting worse, and on December 30, she woke up struggling to breathe.
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Posted by Andrea Titus